Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Terns

This post is for World Bird Wednesday.

While I was out at Inskip Point the other day I watched a small flock of terns that were roosting on the point. There were three of the six species that are often here.
A Caspian Tern (Hydropogne caspia) on the left and a Crested Tern (Sterna bergii) on the right. Both of these terns stay in Australia all year.
A Crested Tern on the left and a Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) on the right. The Common Tern migrates down here for the summer.
Most of the Crested Terns are still away in breeding colonies on off-shore islands but some have already raised their young and are starting to come back here. I saw three very young birds. One of the juveniles was still begging for food from an adult. By the time they come back here they are able to look after themselves but some persist in begging for food from a parent. The parent bird does not seem to take much notice of them!

17 comments:

  1. Hiya Mick,

    Great post.
    That one with the carrot in his face is an ugly brute, but the others are nice. Good to get so many different ones in one visit.
    I always think of terns as very dainty birds, whereas these are quite robust.

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  2. Hi - Thanks for looking at the Pacific Gull post. How did you go with the floods and such like?

    Great pictures of terns (apart from the fact that I think I will have to change my plans as to my next wednesday post as your pics are very similar to mine - oh well!)

    Have a look at http://payingreadyattention.blogspot.com to see what I mean!

    Cheers Stewart M

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  3. I really am amazed at the migration of the terns on this planet. I believe our Common Terns go to Africa but the Artic Terns (a much commoner bird to see in the UK) migrate all the way to Antartica. Awesome

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  4. Good selection of Terns Mick. Lovely birds to watch.

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  5. Very nice photos of these shorebirds!

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  6. I always enjoy seeing terns when I visit the coast--thanks for the migration info--the photos are Great!!

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  7. Great shots, Mick. I thought my Royal was a Caspian at first but decided otherwise. They are so similar.

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  8. Cool birds- I guess the parent decided that it was time to kick the kid out and make him get a job.

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  9. Sizzling shots and a very interesting post. I am just getting familiar with Terns. The distances of their migrations alone make them very impressive creatures. ;-)WBW

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  10. Mick, you got some lovely pictures of the terns; they are all amazing but I particularly love the last one. The difference is size between Caspian,the Crested and the Common Tern is startling.

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  11. beautiful shots of the terns -- they are such remarkable birds with each species just as beautiful as the last. I love the banner for your blog too, a great setting for the sanderlings!

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  12. They are so pretty! Great captures!

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  13. Really great pictures of the terns,the parent doesn`t seem to take much notice of the little one,I always find that somewhat funny,phylliso

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  14. I love the comparison shots between the different Terns. It would be interesting to see a Common or Little Tern up against the Caspian when the Caspian almost dwarfs the Crested Tern.

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  15. Stunning set of images. Its great to see the species side by side. It far easier to get them while they are grounded... i have spent many an hour trying for Little Terns in flight.... I get mostly tail shots or sky scapes

    Dave

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  16. The migration of the birds is such an amazing thing!
    Terrific photos, I love all of them.
    Greetings:)
    J.

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  17. So cool you have captured both species on the top shot. Love your header too.

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