Friday, September 5, 2008

Down the Pathways of the Sky


Down the 'pathways of the sky' from Alaska to Inskip Point. A newly arrived flock of Bar-tailed Godwits rest on a sandbank at high tide.

On the other end of the sand bank there were also small numbers of Eastern Curlews, Grey-tailed Tattlers and Great Knots with the Godwits.Visit SWF today

25 comments:

  1. Alaska is a beautiful place and you captured it well.

    ReplyDelete
  2. wonderful blue sky

    I hope have time to stop at my SWF post : in here and here Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oops! Sorry Bradley - this is Australia the birds have just arrived from Alaska.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Amazing! I just love how you captured those birds! Mine is HERE.Thanks! Happy SWF!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Sea, sand and a beautiful sky with lots of birds make a lovely picture! Happy Sky Watch Friday!

    ReplyDelete
  6. it is worth it that you have posted a marvelous photo. as it is really lovely to see it with the sky…

    check out mine here:HERE

    ReplyDelete
  7. great photos and that is a lot of birds

    ReplyDelete
  8. Mikk: What a great flock of birds for your SWF.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Beautiful capture. Love the birds.

    ReplyDelete
  10. You get some great visitors up there Mick. Nice to see them. We'll get a few down here too, later. When I look at them I'm always amazed at how they got this far.
    Gouldiae

    ReplyDelete
  11. Birds and a big sky always make a glorious landscape! Lovely pics!

    ReplyDelete
  12. beautiful shot:) Alaska or Australia - it is the same sky and it just is wonderful:)

    Petunia's SWF post

    ReplyDelete
  13. Thanks to all the above for your comments. I'll visit as many of you as I can later on today.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hi Mick
    I am impressed that you predicted the arrival of the migrants, and then they turned up.
    Cheers
    Denis

    ReplyDelete
  15. I am so glad that i enlarged the photos to see these great birds as i have never seen or heard of them. Amazing

    ReplyDelete
  16. Thanks again to all for visiting and commenting. Hi Dennis. It's not my skill but rather careful records kept over a number of years by other shorebird enthusiasts and then cumulative records shared.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Inspired by this and your previous post on migrant waders, I trotted off down to a suitable habitat ... and saw nuttin'. (Well, apart from the usual suspect.) So I'll watch them through your posts. I get a better view that way!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Oh dear! Sorry for the lack of waders down your way Snail. I am not even sure when they turn up down there and it is certainly early days up here. Although there was a sizable flock of godwits that I photographed in the last post - in excess of 500 birds by actual count.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Good stuff! I haven't found any big wader roosts in my area yet. There must be some somewhere, That's one thing Scotland had no shortage of.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Gosh Mick - we got really excited at seeing four Bar-tailed Godwits at a Wetland Reserve near us recently. Let alone a whole flock - WOW

    ReplyDelete
  21. I am always amazed at the distance these birds fly. We have the Canadian geese coming through Salem (Oregon) each year. I love taking their photos, especially time when they have their little babies. Nice photos, thanks for the posting.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Hi Mosura, it will be interesting to hear what waders you find down your way later in the season.
    Hi Tricia, I had to get my book out to see where the range of Bar-tailed Godwits was. I hadn't even realized you saw them in Britain. The books say it is a different sub-species - lapponica - and we see baueri. So thank you I have learned something new.
    Hi Columbo, nice to have you comment. Do you see Marbled Godwit where you live or close by? I was lucky enough to see them during the fall migration out on the coast of Washington State a few years ago when I was visiting there.

    ReplyDelete
  23. this is a lovely shot - well captured.

    ReplyDelete