Sunday, September 23, 2012

Lesser Sand Plovers

Visit I'd-Rather-B-Birdin for more birds from around the world. 


I went for a walk at Mullens the other day when the tide was coming in.  Most of the sand flats were already covered so there were very few birds about.  However, the little rocky island at the northern end of the beach often has one or two of the bigger birds roosting on it and this day there was an Eastern Curlew.  They always look beautiful with the stretch of water behind them looking across the bay.

It was only when I looked closer that I realized there were little birds roosting there as well.  Photos showed they were Lesser Sand Plovers (Charadrius  mongulus)


We see quite a number of these birds later in the season but they usually roost in at the main bird roost just around the corner from here.  However, I saw similar birds in this same place when I was first puzzling about the ID of all these small migratory grey and white birds.  It's good to know that they sometimes still use this roosting place.

10 comments:

  1. That curlew is nice-- I haven't seen one of our species in a long time, since moving from the SW US.

    ReplyDelete
  2. it's amazing to be walking along and spotting some awesome, unexpected, birds such as you've shared today!!! I enjoyed the commentary you've added also.

    Thanks for linking up at the Bird D'Pot meme for this weekend!!! Your photos are always a pleasure to view.

    ReplyDelete
  3. plovers are so darn cute. love the curlew bill, though.

    ReplyDelete
  4. The Curlew has an interesting beak, so long and slim with a slight curve. And, the Plovers are cute little things. Great Photos.
    Happy Sunday!

    ReplyDelete
  5. They're a new bird on me, but very nice. I love waders. All quite similar in one way but all very individual. Great shots.

    ReplyDelete
  6. so sweet. It is so great to be able to see the tide. We don´t have any and it was one of the things I loved most about Scotland.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Those little plovers, and sometimes the bigger ones can sure hide away with their cryptic plumage Mick. I guess they need it in the summer time sitting on the tundra with nothing else to disguise them. Nice atmospheric picture of the Curlew too.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Great shots!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

    ReplyDelete